ILC-LANDac Collaboration on Research Internships has 3 different research internship possibilities on around land governance but on different topics and in different places: Italy, Jordan, and Trinidad and Tobago.

Internship option 1:  Multi-stakeholder Platforms for Improved Land Governance: a cross-regional synthesis

Land governance is a multifaced and complex, and requires the involvement of different stakeholders with different sets of interests. One way to involve different actors to discuss the complexity of land governance is through Multistakeholder Platforms (MSPs). Benefits associated with MSP are greater inclusivity, ownership and sustainability of land policy reform. However, in practice there are wide differences in approach, implementation and scale of MSPs, and evidence of MSPs results are thin. Over time, ILC has initiated 26 MSPs in different countries and is now looking to review the results of these MSPs through a cross-regional synthesis of evidence. The focus will be to draw lessons from a large number of MSP’s outcomes through a mixed-method case studies approach. Part of the research is ideally conducted in Rome (Italy), though students can be based anywhere – including ILC’s (NES) member countries.

More information

Name of the organization

International Land Coalition, Secretariat

Contact person

To express interest, please send an e-mail and your CV to: landac.geo@uu.nl before the 25thof January.

For internship specifics, you may contact Yonas Mekonen, y.mekonen@landcoalition.org . Please always CC Silvia Forno, ILC’s internship coordinator: s.forno@landcoalition.info

Location(s) of the internship and research

Rome, Italy. The coordinator of the programme is based at the ILC Secretariat, but the student can be based anywhere. Ideally one third of the time should be spent in Rome.

Proposed topic

Results achieved by initiatives that use Multi-Stakeholders Platform to improve land governance: A cross-regional synthesis of current evidences

Rationale

Background. Land governance is recognized as a complex system beyond the control of individual group of stakeholders, thus requiring approach that deal with dynamic problems in complex environments with multiple actors and functions. One type of response has been the promotion of Multi-stakeholder platforms (MSPs) as an approach to policy dialogue in the field of land and natural resource governance. Attention in policy circles over the last years has reached an unprecedented level, with some of the most globally relevant policy documents and frameworks urging national governments and development actors to take this approach. The application of multi-actor partnerships is promoted in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, under SDG 17. In the land and NR sector, the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests (VGGT) call for MSPs for implementation and monitoring at national level (Part 7, 26.2), while the Framework and Guidelines on Land Policy in Africa “promotes the need for a shared vision among all stakeholders of a comprehensive and coordinated land policy as a major factor in national development”.

With multi-stakeholder platforms active in 26 focal countries, MSPs represent a corner stone of the International Land Coalition (ILC) strategy. ILC plans to increase that number to 35 during the next several years, and is leading a global effort to strengthen Multi-Stakeholder Platforms for People-Centred Land Governance through the coordination of a Global Community of Practice. The Global CoP on MSP aims to increase the capacity of MSP facilitators and ILC members to convene and sustain high-performing multi-stakeholder platforms that accelerate progress in reforming and implementing policies and practices for people-centred land governance.

Problem Statement – The benefits associated with MSPs in the land governance sector include greater inclusivity, ownership, and sustainability of land policy reform. Two structural constraints prevent greater cohesiveness and coordination among MSPs stakeholders. Firstly, while the purpose and function of MSPs in the land governance sector are widely accepted, the differences in approaches, implementation modalities and scale have created a fragmented MSP ecosystem. Secondly, the current body of evidence on the extent to which programmes using MSP approach deliver results is thin.

The Solution – The Global CoP on MSP will offer a common platform for exchange, and serve as a recognized industry convener. Yet given the prominence and proliferation of MSPs, it has become imperative to review the results achieved by initiatives that use Multi-Stakeholders Platform to improve land governance. A cross-regional synthesis of current evidences will pave the way towards helping decision-makers and practitioners to design and implement better initiatives, programmes, share knowledge and achieve greater value for money. A set of specific research questions will be developed and agreed upon during the inception phase responding to the following research objectives:

  1. What results have MSPs delivered?
  2. How do MSP achieve change?
  3. How do national context, and internal governance structure influence outocmes?
  4. Are MSPs contributing to transforming land governance?

 Methodology – For this evidence review, we suggest a mixed method case studies approach drawing from complexity-based evaluation approach, and which aims to generate lessons that can support next stages of program design, implementation and scaling-up. The focus will be to draw lessons from a large number of MSP’s outcomes, from which representative cases studies will be selected. Several steps will guide the research, including:

  1. Desk based literature review
  2. MSP program identification and database selection
  3. Analytical framework design
  4. Case Studies selection
  5. Data collection
  6. Report writing
  7. Communication

The proposed project represents a unique opportunity to contribute to policy relevant research in a time where land rights are recognized as one of the major impediments to inclusive development, and MSP consider a viable solution to overcome sectoral constraints.

Prerequisites

English. French/Spanish an added advantage.

Relevance of the research for the member

The research will feed into the Global CoP on MSP led by the NES team, and respond to the growing call from members’ to build a more robust body of evidences around the outcomes of MSP for people centered land governance. The findings will subsequently support the development of a stronger learning agendas linked to the NESs MSP, including the definition of impact pathways through which NES MSPs are translating into changes in policies and practices.

Relevance of the research for NES/CBI

The research finding will provide relevant information to NES Multi-Stakeholders Platforms, inform the next planning cycle, and open up new avenues for partnership.

What the host can offer

 The host will offer:

  • A stimulating hands-on experience in a stimulating working environment
  • Access to the ILC wider membership composed of +270 organizations
  • Support in engagements with key stakeholders
  • Support the research by providing guidance, and access to specialized expertise
  • Possibility to co-finance a presentation in a relevant policy or academic fora
  • Hosting space and internet.

Budget if based in Rome

800 – 1000 euros per month, depending on lifestyle.


Internship option 2: Several research topics, including: land grabbing, climate change and NRM, customary land and development, ecotourism, community conservation

The Dana and Qadisiyah Local Community Cooperative (Jordan) comprises more than 100 Bedouin families, and was formed by the local community in 1994 to protect its culture and natural heritage. It works to claim the local community’s land rights to its customary land, now known as the Dana Nature Reserve, by empowering members of the local community to adopt a more active socio-political role, and educating a wider, international audience to the community’s loss of land rights. The work has a strong emphasis on empowering young people and women. Some of the Cooperative’s projects concentrate on the restoration of Dana village (an Ottoman village, unique in Jordan), and land protection i.e. protecting local ownership of the village’s individually owned land by encouraging landowners to join the Cooperative and to sell to the Cooperative only. It also has projects related to sustainable tourism, and is proactive in working to preserve the Hima methods (traditional land and natural resources management). In order to inform and best direct the work of the Cooperative, academic research is needed. This is particularly relevant because the local community has an oral tradition rather than a written tradition which means that the people do not have written records. For more information on the research topics the cooperative is interest in, please see the full internship description.

More information

Name of the organization

Dana and Qadisiyah Local Community Cooperative (DQLCC)

Contact person

To express interest, please send an e-mail and your CV to: landac.geo@uu.nl before the 25th of January.

For internship specifics, you may contact Lorraine Walker, Sustainable Development Coordinator: dana.cooperative@gmail.com. Please always CC Silvia Forno, ILC’s internship coordinator: s.forno@landcoalition.info

Location(s) of the internship and research

Dana and Qadisiyah villages, Tafilah, Jordan

Proposed topic

Several research topics (9): land grabbing, climate change and NRM, customary land and development, ecotourism, community conservation…

  1. Land grabbing and local implications – the Dana Nature Reserve represents a form of ‘green grabbing’. This provided an opportunity to compare the local community’s experience directly to a body of academic literature;
  2. Climate change and natural resource management – local implications and resource management within the local pastoralist community;
  3. Analyse the current situation in Dana, compare with other relevant cases and provide recommendations;
  4. Customary land and development – preserving the traditions of communities and their livelihoods;
  5. Ecotourism and the revival of traditions and livelihood;
  6. Traditional or community conservation of nature compared to modern conservation of nature;
  7. The perceived impact of the Dana Nature Reserve – impact perceived by the local community; visitors/tourists to the area; and the managers of the Dana Nature Reserve;
  8. Customary land and conservation as perceived by the different local generations and genders;
  9. The potential role of decentralisation (Governorate Council) in customary land issues
  10. Rationale 

In order to inform and best direct the work of the Cooperative, academic research is needed. This is particularly relevant because the local community has an oral tradition rather than a written tradition which means that the people do not have written records.

Prerequisites (e.g language requirements)

Must be either an Arabic or English speaker

Relevance of the research for the member

The Dana and Qadisiyah Local Community Cooperative comprises more than 100 Bedouin families, and was formed by the local community in 1994 to protect its culture and natural heritage. It works to claim the local community’s land rights to its customary land, now known as the Dana Nature Reserve, by empowering members of the local community to adopt a more active socio-political role, and educating a wider, international audience to the community’s loss of land rights. The work has a strong emphasis on empowering young people and women. Some of the Cooperative’s other projects concentrate on the restoration of Dana village (an Ottoman village, unique in Jordan), and land protection i.e. protecting local ownership of the village’s individually owned land by encouraging landowners to join the Cooperative and to sell to the Cooperative only. It also has projects related to sustainable tourism, and is proactive in working to preserve the Hima methods (traditional land and natural resources management). Within Jordan, it seeks out traditional communities in protected areas, and areas under consideration for protection, in order to share its experiences and support these communities.

Relevance of the research for NES/CBI

The research would directly relate to the Jordanian NES (halted at the development stage); and other NES.

What the host can offer

A unique opportunity for researchers who find the following practicalities acceptable:

  1. The Cooperative is a small, community-based organisation with very limited resources and funding. A placement with the Cooperative will be different from a placement with a NGO or an international organisation. The culture of the Cooperative is Jordanian rather than European.
  2. The Cooperative’s development work is undertaken by volunteers (local and international). This means that the ‘workers’ are often offsite and that there is no formal office.
  3. Research placements will be supervised and supported via the telephone, Skype, email, and WhatsApp by the Cooperative’s Sustainable Development & International Cooperation Manager (a voluntary role).
  4. Researchers are required to provide their own laptops and other necessary equipment related to the research, and to pay for related services including the internet, printing, transportation and the use of an interpreter (if required – this will depend on research activities).
  5. The Cooperative will arrange board and accommodation but all costs are to be met by the students.
  6. All accommodation options are basic, and choice will be determined by availability. Therefore, students must be prepared to accept all options, such as a rented house in Qadisiyah village (simple furnishings and contents to local rental standards) or a hotel in Dana village (similar standard to hostel accommodation).
  7. Jordan is a Muslim country and the Dana and Qadisiyah local community is a conservative community. Students must dress and behave in a modest way at all times. It is important that female students understand that there will be certain restrictions placed upon their behaviour and dress that will not be placed upon their male counterparts. The majority of the locals that the students will meet will be male.
  8. Dana and Qadisiyah are isolated villages in rural, southern Jordan. Students must be prepared to live in a beautiful but isolated location with very limited amenities. A taxi is needed to travel between Dana and Qadisiyah, and buses are available from Qadisiyah to the rest of Jordan

Estimated budget:


Internship option 3: Leasehold and rented land as collateral for financing small-scale agricultural in the Caribbean

Small-scale agriculture in Caribbean Small Island States is hampered by a plethora of challenges. One key challenge is the access to finance for small-scale farmers which limits their ability to be viable and retain lands under agriculture. For historical reasons, many farmers do not own the land they farm but operate under different forms of tenure, such as, leasehold, rental, and informal occupation. In some countries of the Caribbean, financial institutions do not consider alternate forms of tenure on land as collateral which can be used to secure a loan while other Caribbean countries leasehold land can be used as collateral. Further, a bank may have branches in different countries in the Caribbean with a variance in policy based law or practice on the country.  The study will analyse, in five Caribbean countries, the policy of financial institutions using alternate forms of tenure as collateral and the rationale behind policy differences. The research will be conducted in Trinidad and Tobago including desktop research of other countries.

More information

Name of the organization

The Caribbean Network for Urban and Land Management (CNULM)

Contact person

To express interest, please send an e-mail and your CV to: landac.geo@uu.nl before the 25th of January.

For internship specifics, you may contact Dr. Asad Mohammed: Asad.Mohammed@uwi.sta.edu. Please always CC Silvia Forno, ILC’s internship coordinator:s.forno@landcoalition.info

Location(s) of the internship and research

The student will be based at the St. Augustine campus of the University of the West Indies, The research will be conducted in Trinidad and Tobago including desktop research of other countries.

Proposed topic

Leasehold and rented land as collateral for financing small-scale agricultural in the Caribbean

Rationale

Small scale agriculture in Caribbean Small Island States is hampered by a plethora of challenges. One key challenge is the access to finance for small scale farmers which limits their ability to be viable and retain lands under agriculture. For historical reasons, many farmers do not own the land they farm but operate under different forms of tenure, such as, leasehold, rental, and informal occupation. In some countries of the Caribbean, financial institutions do not consider alternate forms of tenure on land as collateral which can be used to secure a loan while other Caribbean countries leasehold land can be used as collateral. Further, a bank may have branches in different countries in the Caribbean with a variance in policy based law or practice on the country.  The study will analyse, in five Caribbean countries, the policy of financial institutions using alternate forms of tenure as collateral and the rationale behind policy differences.

Prerequisites 

  • Experience with alternate land tenure or financing of agriculture will be an asset
  • Good command of English

Relevance of the research for the member

The CNULM works towards improvement of land and planning policy in the region through networking land practioners, planners, academics, other members of civil society and key decision makers. As the only ILC member in the Caribbean, it is piloting the development of a Caribbean Land Actors Platform with associated National Land Actor’s Platforms in participating countries. A better understanding of this issue is a precursor to advocacy actions.

Relevance of the research for NES/CBI

The issue has been identified by the Agricultural Alliance of the Caribbean (AACARI) who may form part of the Caribbean Land Actors platform. Follow up on this action is important  to demonstrate the benefit of participating a regional platform.

What the host can offer

The CNULM / UWI can offer supervision of the work and country contacts. Further it can provide a space for the student to work, library access and assist in identifying accommodation.


Internship option 4: Assessment of the feasibility of collecting data for the suite of LANDex indicators in Trinidad and Tobago

Information on land rights in the Caribbean is limited. LANDex is an indicator system based on the ILC’s ten (10) commitments and allows for the monitoring of People Centered Land Governance in a country. Based on an analysis of the existing LANDex methodologies the following challenges to data gathering in Caribbean Islands are foreseen: lack of data; institutions not sharing data; cost and complexity in conducting surveys; lack of suitable experts. Assessing the feasibility of data collecting in Trinidad and Tobago can allow for persons and institutions with appropriate data to be identified as well as country specific survey design methodologies to be created. While it is not expected for all the data to be collected, attempting to collect the data will identify challenges to be addressed and strategies for further data collection. This research will facilitate the adaptation of LANDex to the Caribbean. The research will be conducted in Trinidad and Tobago including desktop research of other countries.

More information

Name of the organization

The Caribbean Network for Urban and Land Management (CNULM)

Contact person

To express interest, please send an e-mail and your CV to: landac.geo@uu.nl before the 25th of January.

For internship specifics, you may contact Dr. Asad Mohammed Asad.Mohammed@uwi.sta.edu. Please always CC Silvia Forno, ILC’s internship coordinator:s.forno@landcoalition.info.

Location(s) of the internship and research

The student will be based at the St. Augustine campus of the University of the West Indies, The research will be conducted in Trinidad and Tobago including desktop research of other countries.

Proposed topic

Assessment of the feasibility of collecting data for the suite of LANDex indicators in Trinidad and Tobago

Rationale

Information on land rights in the Caribbean is limited. LANDex is an indicator system based on the ILC’s ten (10) commitments and allows for the monitoring of People Centered Land Governance in a country. Based on an analysis of the existing LANDex methodologies the following challenges to data gathering in Caribbean Islands are foreseen: lack of data; institutions not sharing data; cost and complexity in conducting surveys; lack of suitable experts. Assessing the feasibility of data collecting in Trinidad and Tobago can allow for persons and institutions with appropriate data to be identified as well as country specific survey design methodologies to be created. While it is not expected for all the data to be collected, attempting to collect the data will identify challenges to be addressed and strategies for further data collection. This research will facilitate the adaptation of LANDex to the Caribbean.

Prerequisites (e.g language requirements)

  • B.Sc. in a land related discipline,
  • Knowledge of the use of indicators such as LANDex
  • Prior experience in surveys or data collection
  • Good command of English

Relevance of the research for the member

The CNULM works towards improvement of land and planning policy in the region through networking land practitioners, planners, academics, other members of civil society and key decision makers. As the only ILC member in the Caribbean, it is piloting the development of a Caribbean Land Actors Platform with associated National Land Actor’s Platforms in participating countries. LANDex data will assist the national platform in Trinidad and Tobago develop coherent strategies to improve land rights based on deficiencies identified in the study.

Relevance of the research for NES/CBI

The regional platform will benefit as lessons learnt during the case study in Trinidad and Tobago can be shared and strategies can be put in place to overcome challenges which may now be foreseen.

What the host can offer

The CNULM / UWI can offer supervision of the work, Library access at the University of the West Indies.  space for the student to work and assist in identifying accommodation.


 

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